Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Why is a 'jolly good fellow' always jolly?

A 'jolly old good fellow' by his Shepherd's Hut
It must be the 'silly season' i.e month of August otherwise why else would Jacob Rees-Mogg be the flavour of the moment when the mood is anti-Tory, anti-austerity and anti-jolly?


All stalwart Liberals/Lefties like me are weighed down with the worry of a nuclear war in the offing and Donald Trump's ill focus on the Governor of Guam becoming famous, ongoing austerity with no sign of lifting, climate change thanks to Al Gore's latest movie 'An Inconvenient Sequel' and escalating violence and rhetoric around racism.


There isn't anything to be jolly about and the very unjolly Polly Toynbee has struck the right note with her piece in The Guardian on Jacob Rees-Mogg, the current inheritor of the 'jolly good fellow' trophy. Jacob Rees-Mogg is one in a short line of recent such fellows, the others being Boris Johnsons and Nigel Farage. Before that, I can't quite remember the whole line of them, we had Kenneth Clarke, Alan Clark and, dare I say this, David Cameron.


All these men have at various stages been either overtly referred to as 'jolly good' men or been loosely bestowed with this title. What is the unifying factor? Quite obviously they are all white men, members of the Tory party or a pale imitation of it (UKIP) and rather well off.


By my reckoning, being jolly is a social divider.


The further up the social scale you are positioned the jollier you are. The lower down the ladder you are the harder it is to remain jolly and optimistic.


There you have it. Being rich allows you to be a 'jolly good fellow'. If you don't have to worry about how much next week's food shopping is going to cost because the kids are home all day during the summer, or about your child starting university next month and the hike in domestic expenditure that this will entail or about the cost of a day out to gawk at poor animals behind cages in what is called 'London Zoo' then you, frankly, can AFFORD to be jolly.


David Cameron is so jolly that he owns something called a 'Shepherd's Hut' priced at £25,000. Boris Johnson earned loads even if he has taken a pay cut. Kenneth Clarke smokes cigars and wears nice Brogues - rich. Alan Clark was someone I never liked and I can't be bothered to Google him to include a link but I do recall his comment about Michael Heseltine's furniture being new as opposed to being tatty because it was inherited. Nigel Farage was some sort of banker and always poses for photos grinning like there is no tomorrow.


Jacob Rees-Mogg seems to trump all the 'jolliers' though because he is obviously super wealthy to have had a nanny block his neck from the blistering sun by holding a book as a sun shield. I buy Factor 30 from Boots to block my daughter's neck. See the difference? I am not jolly. He is.


There is a serious purpose to this blog article and it is this - I am sick about the way jollity is used as a mask to portray the cruel and divisive political ideologue behind it. A smile, a laugh and a twinkle in the eye to win votes while all the while making a mockery of the gullible voter who falls for it all.


Boris Johnson used his 'jollity' as a lethal political weapon when he was standing for Mayor and during his stint as Mayor of London. More recently his jollity has been exhibited via jokes at the European Union's expense. Nothing jolly about this when you consider that he was a primary Brexiter who helped  peddle unproven facts like the £350 million a week that the UK will supposedly have.


I spent my journey into work this morning trying to work out how many 'jolly good' fellows I know. Three, readers, three. What does that say about my social mobility? Only one is a good friend, the other two attend my church whom I would term 'acquaintances'. All are White men who earn well over £150,000 which is the threshold for being a part of the 1%. I rest my case.  
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